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Kyoto: Tenryuji (Temple)

Located in 68 Susukinobaba-cho, Saga-Tenryuji, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto City in Kyoto Prefecture, Tenryuji (Temple) is one of the 17 UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Kyoto City.

Tenryuji (Temple) was built under the instructions of shogun Ashikaga Takauji in 1339 in memory of Emperor Go-Daigo who had passed away that year. The temple's name tenryu literally translates to the "dragon of the sky". The name came from a dream of Ashikaga Takauji's younger brother Tadayoshi. The temple was completed at around 1345 and the eminent Rinzai Zen master Muso Soseki was appointed as its founding abbot after which the temple prospered as the most important Rinzai temple in Kyoto. With that, the temple's land grew to as big as 33 hectares. 
Muso Soseki

Now going back to Muso Soseki... He was known as the most famous monk of his time. Aside from being a Rinzai Zen Buddhist, he was also a teacher, calligraphist, poet, and garden designer. Although he has designed a lot of gardens in his lifetime, most of them were destroyed during the Onin War. However, some survived until today such as the gardens of Saiho-ji (also called Koke-dera) in Kyoto and Eiho-ji in Gifu and of course the garden of Tenryuji. 
Let's go!


Find time to read this to discover the history of the place
Tenryuji's Kuri building




The Hojo
Hatto

Since its founding, Tenryuji (Temple) has been ravaged by Mother Nature and by man a lot of times, as a matter of fact, its buildings burnt down due to several major fires. Despite this, it was rebuilt several times thru the financial support of the people including the famous shogun Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Sadly, in 1877, as the temple was in the process of rebuilding after being consumed by the great fire of 1864, the Meiji government confiscated most of its lands reducing the temple complex to only less than a tenth of its original land area. Regardless, rebuilding efforts still continued until the late nineteenth century. Some buildings were moved in different locations within the temple vicinity while some buildings were reconstructed and new structures were built like the Shoun-kaku and Kan'u-tei (tea houses). 
Some stone decorations near the entrance to the garden

Unlike the temple buildings, the garden of Tenryuji AKA Sogenchi Teien mostly survived for centuries and is still largely in its original form. Like the other gardens designed by Muso Soseki, Tenryuji's garden features a central pond surrounded by rocks and pine trees. Today, it is probably safe to say that Tenryuji's garden is the main highlight of one's visit to Tenryuji (Temple).
Hachiman Shrine

Seems like they're enjoying the stroll 

Gotta love the Kuri building


My family and I got to visit Tenryuji (temple) in the afternoon of our second day in Kyoto. It was such a good decision that we visited in the afternoon as there were only a handful of visitors. However, we were pressed for time as the temple closes at 5:30PM and we had other places to visit before sunset. Regardless, we still managed to explore some parts of this historic temple. Sadly, I was not able to get a goshuin for my collection. It just goes to show that I should revisit the temple again someday. 
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Check out who had fun exploring...

Overall, Tenryuji (Temple) is a must visit if you love history and nature. It is ranked as one of the five greatest Zen Temples in Kyoto aside from being registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto" in 1994. If you're planning to visit, keep in mind that the temple opens 8:30 AM and you need to pay 500 yen admission fee to view the garden and an additional 300 yen to enter the temple buildings (Pre-school children are free).

Getting there:

Ride the Keifuku Randen (train) and board down at the  Arashiyama Station. From there Tenryuji (temple) is about 5 minutes walk away. 

You can also take the Kyoto City Bus #61, 72, or 83 and board down at Arashiyama Tenryu-ji Mae bus stop. 


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Comments

  1. I just came back from there few months ago, the tranquility and peace experienced in Kyoto temples is unforgettable.

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    Replies
    1. Wow! I have seen your blog to. I love your write up about Kyoto.

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  2. That's super interesting! I've always been fascinated with the temples of Japan. In fact, I want to visit them when I go to Japan someday!

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  3. Beautiful, vibrant pictures and informative blog. I learnt a lot, thank you:)
    Risen from ashes again and again, what could be better message for humans!?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for visiting my blog.
      That's true Peter. Gotta dig deep about what really does it say to us humans. =)

      Delete
  4. Beautiful photos! Well done. :-)

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  5. I visited here a couple of years back. Kyoto is such a beautiful part of Japan!

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    Replies
    1. I agree with that. I fell in love with Kyoto the first time I stepped there.

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  6. Thanks for sharing such beautiful culture, amazing!

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  7. This post is stunning! Thank you so much for sharing such beautiful photos. Rach

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  8. I enjoyed this temple immensely when we also visited Kyoto. Was very pregnant-lady friendly 😂

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  9. Thank you very much for such useful information! I feel that I shall be benefitted and my friends will be benefitted! will go Japan next year!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's really great to hear. I hope you'd get to visit Tenryuji too.

      Delete
  10. Lovely pictures and informations. Your writing is beautiful. I look forward to read more from you.

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  11. Very nice. You are my window to Japan. I learned from your travel.......

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  12. Thanks for this post! I think this adds my dream itenary to Japan to over a month now! Haha

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  13. The temple is gorgeous, I love all of the gardens. It is kid friendly?

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    Replies
    1. Yes it is. =) Your kid would surely love running around the temple vicinity.

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  14. Not a fan of temples in cities but I'd keep this in mind when I visit Kyoto.

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  15. Kyoto Buddhists temple seems to be favorite place for most traveler. I read quite a few blogs regarding their visits on this place. Definitely a must-visit place!

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    Replies
    1. Yes that's true Nina. It's actually the rich history that brought me here.

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  16. Its definitely a place I would love to travel too. For a man from the UK I love these temples amazing.

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  17. So beautiful love it! I should def go here!

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  18. The photos looks amazing as if no one was there but just you guys! Kyoto is really on top of my places to go, I hope it will be next year.

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    Replies
    1. Here's a tip... visit famous places in the afternoon. Just when it's about to close for the day. =)

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  19. Thats cool! I am planning to go JP next year

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    Replies
    1. Wow! I envy you. I wish I could go back there again soon.

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